Sports games

Shortage of referees in schools impacting the programming of high school sports matches

Schools are seeing a shortage of referees to cover their sports matches. This has an impact on how games are planned now. The shortage stems from a number of reasons, officials are getting older, the pandemic has led many people to leave or abuse spectators and coaches. He leaves it up to sports directors to plan games about four days a week. “We are definitely in an official crisis,” said Jean Ashen, athletic director of North Salinas High School. For years, schools have said they are seeing fewer and fewer referees putting on their cleats to officiate school sports matches. Ahsen said the shortage causes them to stagger their games from Wednesday to Saturday. Ashen said, “And it’s hard to come back to school the next day after a Thursday night game, and it’s hard to see the Friday night lights and people want to stay on Friday. However, having officials is extremely. important to our competition and they are an integral part of that. ” Peninsula Sports Inc. provides referees for Central Coast schools including North Salinas High. They said there were several reasons for the shortage, some referees were just getting older, while others complained about abuse from coaches and parents. They estimate that around 80% of the referees left in two years because of a bad experience. “Over the years more and more I’ve had to call schools like we can’t cover your game,” said Tom Emery, owner of Peninsula Sports Inc .. “I have a lot of guys hanging up. their cleats now, they’re retiring, they said I just didn’t want to go. ” At North Salinas High, Ashen said they are having a meeting with the coaches. night, where they discuss expectations for fair play and respect for officials. “Without them, we don’t have a competition. So we need them to be there just like we want them to be there. We want to provide these opportunities to our students, but we have to be able to keep some cold-blooded in these contests, ”Ashen said. It’s up to schools and companies like Peninsula Sports to get creative in how they attract officials. “You have the best seat in the house to watch some of the greatest sports happen. And you do it for the kids, you do it for the fun of it,” Emery said. North Salinas High is currently implementing a comprehensive program for each sport. They are also still waiting for the California Department of Public Health to release its athletics guidelines. This could include random COVID-19 testing for indoor sports.

Schools are seeing a shortage of referees to cover their sports matches. This has an impact on how games are planned now.

The shortage stems from a number of reasons, officials are getting older, the pandemic has led many people to leave or abuse spectators and coaches.

He leaves it up to sports directors to plan games about four days a week.

“We are definitely in an official crisis,” said Jean Ashen, athletic director of North Salinas High School.

For years, schools have said they have seen fewer and fewer referees putting on their cleats to referee school sports matches.

Ahsen said the shortage causes them to stagger their games from Wednesday to Saturday.

Ashen said, “And it’s hard to come back to school the next day after a Thursday night game, and it’s hard to see the Friday night lights and people want to stay on Friday. However, having officials is extremely. important to our competition and they are an integral part of that. ”

Peninsula Sports Inc. provides referees for Central Coast schools including North Salinas High. They said there were several reasons for the shortage, some referees were just getting older, while others complained about abuse from coaches and parents.

They estimate that around 80% of the referees left in two years because of a bad experience.

“Over the years more and more I’ve had to call schools like we can’t cover your game,” said Tom Emery, owner of Peninsula Sports Inc .. “I have a lot of guys hanging up. their cleats now, they’re retiring, they said I just didn’t want to go. “

At North Salinas High, Ashen said they were having an evening of meet the coaches, where they discussed expectations for fair play and respect for officials.

“Without them, we don’t have a competition. So we need them to be there just like we want them to be there. We want to provide these opportunities to our students, but we have to be able to keep some cold-blooded in these contests, ”Ashen said.

It’s up to schools and companies like Peninsula Sports to get creative in how they attract officials.

“You have the best seat in the house to watch some of the greatest sports happen. And you do it for the kids, you do it for the fun of it,” Emery said.

North Salinas High is currently implementing a comprehensive program for each sport. They are also still waiting for the California Department of Public Health to release its athletics guidelines. This could include random COVID-19 testing for indoor sports.


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